Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs

Dashboard
Notifications
Mark all as read
Q&A

What's special about a winter gas mixture? Why does it work better?

+2
−1

There’s a special “winter” gas mix available for gas stoves. How is it different from the usual propane/butane mix and why does it work better in low temperatures? (Does it work better in lower temperatures? :-)

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/q/3353. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

2 answers

+3
−0

While there seem to be a few different mixtures, key to them all is a lower vapourisation temperature requirement and lower viscosity so they are easier to ignite.

In cold weather, normal fuel may not flow well or may not be able to light as it won't vapourise.

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

0 comment threads

+1
−0

Different gasses have different boiling points. Under boiling point the gas is liquid and doesn't have enough pressure to come out from the canister (if used in upright position).

The boiling points of usual gasses used in (camping) gas stoves are:

  • Propane: −42.25 to −42.04 °C
  • Butane: −1 to 1 °C
  • Isobutane: −13 to −9 °C

source Wikipedia: Propane, butane and isobutane.

The propane is the best gas to use in cold winter as it will stay gas in really cold temperatures.

However, the vapor pressure of propane is really high (see Wikipedia) compared to for example butane (see Wikipedia) which means 100% propane needs heavy steel canister to hold the gas, adding more weight for backpacking. Making a solution of, for example 70% butane and 30% propane, will allow for a more light weight aluminum canister and decrease the boiling point to be suitable for colder weather.

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/5866. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

Sign up to answer this question »

This community is part of the Codidact network. We have other communities too — take a look!

Want to advertise this community? Use our templates!

Like what we're doing? Support us! Donate