Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs
Community Proposals
Community Proposals
tag:snake search within a tag
answers:0 unanswered questions
user:xxxx search by author id
score:0.5 posts with 0.5+ score
"snake oil" exact phrase
votes:4 posts with 4+ votes
created:<1w created < 1 week ago
post_type:xxxx type of post
Search help
Notifications
Mark all as read See all your notifications »
Q&A

How to clean a sleeping bag ?

+3
−0

A sleeping bag will eventually need a cleaning. How do you proceed, in particular according to the different materials?

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/q/1627. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

3 answers

+2
−0

The procedure is roughly the same for both Down and Synthetic, however down requires special precautions:

  • Never dryclean.
  • Wash by hand in a bathtub, or use a front-loading washing machine on gentle cycle. Down bags have thin baffles inside that keep the feathers partitioned. Agitators will put enough stress on the bag you risk tearing those baffles resulting in the dreaded clump.
  • Use non-detergent, no-perfume, non-bleach soap such as Nikwax designed for washing down. (There are common non-detergent laundry soaps as well). Down is a natural organic material, and hard detergents / bleaches can damage it.
  • When drying, use low heat (or no heat) on gentle cycle, and toss in a couple of tennis balls. The balls add some extra non-destructive ooomph to the process that helps break up clumps of down. Check regularly and pull apart any down clumps by hand you encounter.

Sadly, despite being as careful as possible, washed down almost never seems to be as good as new. So do it only when necessary - if ever. Smelly bags can often improve just by laying out in the sun for a few hours. UV is brutal on funk-bugs.

PROTIP: Using a sleeping bag liner (silk or other) that will intercept your body's dirt and oils (the down-killers) will extend the life or your bag.

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/1657. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

+1
−0

Additionally to @Lost's solid answer, take special care when handling the wet bag! The fabrics aren't designed to take on the weight of all that absorbed water. Never just grab it from one place. Instead support it's weight from below over a large area. Like you would lift a friendly (and preferably dry) golden retriever.

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

0 comment threads

+0
−0

First of all, check the label for directions.

I have a synthetic bag. I take it to the laundromat and wash it in a sufficiently large front-load machine, using cold water and somewhat less detergent than a normal load. I put it in a large dryer set to low or no heat until it seems mostly dry. Then I hang it up indoors for a day or two to finish drying. This seems to be pretty effective.

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/1636. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

Sign up to answer this question »