Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs
Community Proposals
Community Proposals
tag:snake search within a tag
answers:0 unanswered questions
user:xxxx search by author id
score:0.5 posts with 0.5+ score
"snake oil" exact phrase
votes:4 posts with 4+ votes
created:<1w created < 1 week ago
post_type:xxxx type of post
Search help
Notifications
Mark all as read See all your notifications »
Q&A

What are safe/effective leaves from around the world for use in tidying up your backside after answering the call of nature?

+0
−0

This partially answered in this question about toilet paper alternatives but it only says be careful what plants you use.

I'd like to know specifically what plants are the best in your part of the world and why? Also, where is that part of the world? If you could comment on availability, durability, potential for collection and carrying, and other relevant info that would be a big help.

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/q/7406. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

6 answers

+1
−0

Leaves are only an option while they're in season. In winter, snowballs work great.

enter image description here

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/9590. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

+1
−0

Thimbleberry leaves are my favourite (Rubus spectabilis), They're all over the place in the Kootenays in British Columbia (Southern Canadian Rockies). They're soft and they're about the size of your hand or bigger. The berries are very tasty too, so you you can have a peachy-fuzz-tart-raspberry snack while you do your business.

enter image description here

enter image description here

Hand for reference, this leaf was about 30cm wide.

enter image description here

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/7414. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

+1
−0

I'll start with a local favorite: great mullein or common mullein (Verbascum thapsus)

Introduced to the North America. I've found it from New York to North Carolina. Apparently originated in Europe and Asia, I think.

The leaves are large, moderately durable, thick, but soft and fuzzy. Their usefulness is somewhat limited by the fact that they tend to be found on disturbed sites in full sun - and not likely to be found in deep shaded forest areas. But the leaves remain usable for some time, so you can collect some for later use.

enter image description here

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/7408. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

+0
−0

The leaves of the Striped Maple ("Moose Maple") are a no-contest winner, at least in the forests of the northeastern US. The leaves are large, and softer than some forms of toilet paper.

Striped maple

As for availability: Anecdotally, I tend to see this plant in most deciduous forests of New Hampshire. It tends to grow bush-like near the ground, at least while it's young. At higher elevations you may need to resort to another alternative.

As for durability: It's a leaf of the same thickness as a standard maple leaf - don't expect it to survive days in your pack. It's got the durability of a leaf; nothing special. Shouldn't break while you're using it, if you're reasonably careful.

via Wikipedia

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/7411. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

+0
−0

Plantago major is not only a rough plant with strong leaves which grows technically everywhere, but also a useful herb. Try to find bigger leaves, perhaps not from the strict proximity of the road.

enter image description here

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/9591. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

+0
−0

Dock leaves are good:

enter image description here

They're big, durable, plentiful, and (most importantly) non-stinging. A little rough, maybe, but what do you expect from a leaf... ?

Remember, try to leave no trace.

History
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/7407. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

0 comment threads

Sign up to answer this question »