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Waxing G-1000 trousers - melting options

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I really need to wax my G-1000 trousers - but I do not own a clothes iron and only a flimsy travel hairdryer. The instructions for the trousers/wax say, I should use either to melt the wax after applying it, so it seeps into the fabric. A third option is to hold the trouser close to an evenly burning fire (camping cooker/stove), but please not too close.


Now, lacking most options mentioned above, I got a "great" idea: Why not set my oven to 50-60°C, apply the wax and heat the trouser in the oven?

So, how bad is this idea? Did anyone try this? How did it turn out?

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This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/q/24771. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

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I would try the "flimsy travel hairdryer". It does not take that much heat to melt the wax, just keep it close to the trousers.

I got a G1000 hat and once successfully used a burning candle to get the wax in. Just rubbed it on got my hand in the hat and moved it close to the flame. If the wax melts you are good, your hand on the other side of the garment is an excellent heat indicator

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This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/24822. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

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That should work great.

As you probably know The G-1000 fabric is a specific cotton-polyester blend. Cotton and polyester will not be damaged by those temperatures.

The Greenland wax is made from beeswax and parrafine. Neither will evaporate at those temperatures so your oven won't end up covered in waxy residue.

I can think of only two possible problems: 1. The wax drips off and the bottom of your oven gets waxed. This is easily caught with oven paper. 2. The wax is not spread out evenly. This is easily fixed by washing your trousers up to three times at 40 degrees Celcius, that should completely remove all wax.

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This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/24837. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

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