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Can trees be treated to deter poachers?

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I recently heard from a guy who decided to cut a cedar tree from a ditch line for a Christmas tree instead of buying one. He said that after getting it home and decorating it that it started to have a very strong smell of urine. By the end of the day they were taking it down and hauling it to the curb.

What seems odd to me is how he would not of smelled anything while cutting it down or putting it up. It seems that an odor from an animal marking the tree would have been immediately noticed. Are there chemicals that can be applied to trees that would not smell until some time after warming up? And if so, how would any nearby neighbors not be affected on warmer days? Personally, if this is the case, I find it a sweet case of justice and applaud the use of it assuming there is no ecological harm done.

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This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/q/24443. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

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1 answer

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It has been done:

Skunk spray, fox urine, heat activated sulfur smell, common ammonia, and even essence of bone tar oil.

Mental Floss

New York Times

This post was sourced from https://outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/24444. It is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

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